Psychotherapy Services

Bonnie’s practice is closing for an unspecified period of time as of August 5th, 2022.

Individual Psychotherapy for Adults who are terminally ill or are experiencing a life-limiting disease or illness.

Bonnie specializes in issues related to death and dying.


Approaches in therapy may include:


Telehealth

Sessions are offered by telehealth using online video on a HIPAA Compliant platform.

Check your device capability now by visiting Bonnie’s Doxy.me Waiting Room. https://doxy.me/bonniemckeeganlcsw No app needed.

When prompted click Yes to Audio and Visual. Cell phones and other devices should be fully charged before the call. Cell phones should not be plugged in or charging while on the call due to possible overheating. There is no app needed to use Doxy.me.

Tips for a great call on Doxy.me


Home Visits

Home visits in the Grass Valley/Nevada City area may be possible for homebound clients..


Documents

Documents are completed in the Simple Practice Client Portal after your therapist sends you your secure log-in information.

Simple Practice Portal: https://bonniemckeegan.clientsecure.me/


Insurances Accepted

  • Regular Medicare
  • Private Pay only. Private Pay means there is no possibility of insurance reimbursement.

Billing

  • Bonnie’s office completes the billing for Medicare and Medicare secondary insurances.
  • Private Pay fees are due on the date of service.

Clients are responsible for understanding their Medicare plus secondary insurance coverage including copays, coinsurance, deductibles, and other limitations/benefits. Bonnie’s office will assist you with this information.


Appointment reminders are available.


Professional Therapeutic Support Offered for:

  • Issues related to terminal illness or a life-limiting illness/disease

If you are on hospice care, you may still be eligible for Medicare coverage of psychotherapy from a private therapist if your problems are unrelated to your terminal diagnosis.


Free Services

  • Information and referral regarding End-of-Life Care Planning Options, Advance Directives, and Medical Aid in Dying
  • Brief Phone consultation to see if therapy might be right for you


State of California Complaint Disclaimer:

The California Board of Behavioral Sciences is the licensing entity for Social Workers in California.  You may file a complaint by contacting: Board of Behavioral Sciences 1625 North Market Blvd., Suite S200, Sacramento, CA 95834 Telephone: (916) 574-7830 www.bbs.ca.gov  .


HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices (HIPAA NPP)

Bonnie McKeegan, LCSW Grass Valley, CA 95949 (530)559-8406

NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES

THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW HEALTH INFORMATION MAY BE USED AND DISCLOSED AND HOW YOU CAN GET ACCESS TO THIS INFORMATION. PLEASE REVIEW IT CAREFULLY.

I. MY PLEDGE REGARDING HEALTH INFORMATION:

I understand that health information about you and your health care is personal. I am committed to protecting health information about you. I create a record of the care and services you receive from me. I need this record to provide you with quality care and to comply with certain legal requirements. This notice applies to all of the records of your care generated by this mental health care practice. This notice will tell you about the ways in which I may use and disclose health information about you. I also describe your rights to the health information I keep about you, and describe certain obligations I have regarding the use and disclosure of your health information. I am required by law to:

Make sure that protected health information (“PHI”) that identifies you is kept private.

Give you this notice of my legal duties and privacy practices with respect to health information.

Follow the terms of the notice that is currently in effect.

I can change the terms of this Notice, and such changes will apply to all information I have about you. The new notice will be available upon request, in my office, and on my website.

II. HOW I MAY USE AND DISCLOSE HEALTH INFORMATION ABOUT YOU:

The following categories describe different ways that I use and disclose health information. For each category of uses or disclosures, I will explain what I mean and try to give some examples. Not every use or disclosure in a category will be listed. However, all of the ways I am permitted to use and disclose information will fall within one of the categories.

For Treatment Payment, or Health Care Operations: Federal privacy rules (regulations) allow health care providers who have direct treatment relationship with the patient/client to use or disclose the patient/client’s personal health information without the patient’s written authorization, to carry out the health care provider’s own treatment, payment or health care operations. I may also disclose your protected health information for the treatment activities of any health care provider. This, too, can be done without your written authorization. For example, if a clinician were to consult with another licensed health care provider about your condition, we would be permitted to use and disclose your personal health information, which is otherwise confidential, in order to assist the clinician in diagnosis and treatment of your mental health condition. An example is your insurance company’s case management division may contact your clinician to discuss treatment progress and prognosis.

Disclosures for treatment purposes are not limited to the minimum necessary standard. Because therapists and other health care providers need access to the full record and/or full and complete information in order to provide quality care. The word “treatment” includes, among other things, the coordination and management of health care providers with a third party, consultations between health care providers and referrals of a patient for health care from one health care provider to another.

Lawsuits and Disputes: If you are involved in a lawsuit, I may disclose health information in response to a court or administrative order. I may also disclose health information about your child in response to a subpoena, discovery request, or other lawful process by someone else involved in the dispute, but only if e orts have been made to tell you about the request or to obtain an order protecting the information requested.

III.   CERTAIN USES AND DISCLOSURES REQUIRE YOUR AUTHORIZATION:

1.      Psychotherapy Notes. I do keep “psychotherapy notes” as that term is defined in 45 CFR § 164.501, and any use or disclosure of such notes requires your Authorization unless the use or disclosure is:

a.   For my use in treating you.

b.   For my use in training or supervising mental health practitioners to help them improve their skills in group, joint, family, or individual counseling or therapy.

c.    For my use in defending myself in legal proceedings instituted by you.

d.   For use by the Secretary of Health and Human Services to investigate my compliance with HIPAA.

e.   Required by law and the use or disclosure is limited to the requirements of such law.

f.     Required by law for certain health oversight activities pertaining to the originator of the psychotherapy notes.

g.   Required by a coroner who is performing duties authorized by law.

h.   Required to help avert a serious threat to the health and safety of others.

2.      Marketing Purposes. As a psychotherapist, I will not use or disclose your PHI for marketing purposes.

3.      Sale of PHI. As a psychotherapist, I will not sell your PHI in the regular course of my business.

IV.   CERTAIN USES AND DISCLOSURES DO NOT REQUIRE YOUR AUTHORIZATION. Subject to certain limitations in the law, I can use and disclose your PHI without your Authorization for the following reasons:

1.      When disclosure is required by state or federal law, and the use or disclosure complies with and is limited to the relevant requirements of such law.

2.      For public health activities, including reporting suspected child, elder, or dependent adult abuse, or preventing or reducing a serious threat to anyone’s health or safety.

3.      For health oversight activities, including audits and investigations.

4.      For judicial and administrative proceedings, including responding to a court or administrative order, although my preference is to obtain an Authorization from you before doing so.

5.      For law enforcement purposes, including reporting crimes occurring on my premises.

6.      To coroners or medical examiners, when such individuals are performing duties authorized by law.

7.      For research purposes, including studying and comparing the mental health of patients who received one form of therapy versus those who received another form of therapy for the same condition.

8.      Specialized government functions, including ensuring the proper execution of military missions; protecting the President of the United States; conducting intelligence or counter-intelligence operations; or helping to ensure the safety of those working within or housed in correctional institutions.

9.      For workers’ compensation purposes. Although my preference is to obtain an Authorization from you, I may provide your PHI in order to comply with workers’ compensation laws.

10.   Appointment reminders and health related benefits or services. I may use and disclose your PHI to contact you to remind you that you have an appointment with me. I may also use and disclose your PHI to tell you about treatment alternatives, or other health care services or benefits that I offer.

V.     CERTAIN USES AND DISCLOSURES REQUIRE YOU TO HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO OBJECT.

1.      Disclosures to family, friends, or others. I may provide your PHI to a family member, friend, or other person that you indicate is involved in your care or the payment for your health care, unless you object in whole or in part. The opportunity to consent may be obtained retroactively in emergency situations.

VI.   YOU HAVE THE FOLLOWING RIGHTS WITH RESPECT TO YOUR PHI:

1.      The Right to Request Limits on Uses and Disclosures of Your PHI. You have the right to ask me not to use or disclose certain PHI for treatment, payment, or health care operations purposes. I am not required to agree to your request, and I may say “no” if I believe it would affect your health care.

2.      The Right to Request Restrictions for Out-of-Pocket Expenses Paid for In Full. You have the right to request restrictions on disclosures of your PHI to health plans for payment or health care operations purposes if the PHI pertains solely to a health care item or a health care service that you have paid for out-of-pocket in full.

3.      The Right to Choose How I Send PHI to You. You have the right to ask me to contact you in a specific way (for example, home or office phone) or to send mail to a different address, and I will agree to all reasonable requests.

4.      The Right to See and Get Copies of Your PHI. Other than “psychotherapy notes,” you have the right to get an electronic or paper copy of your medical record and other information that I have about you. I will provide you with a copy of your record, or a summary of it, if you agree to receive a summary, within 30 days of receiving your written request, and I may charge a reasonable, cost-based fee for doing so.

5.      The Right to Get a List of the Disclosures I Have Made. You have the right to request a list of instances in which I have disclosed your PHI for purposes other than treatment, payment, or health care operations, or for which you provided me with an Authorization. I will respond to your request for an accounting of disclosures within 60 days of receiving your request. The list I will give you will include disclosures made in the last six years unless you request a shorter time. I will provide the list to you at no charge, but if you make more than one request in the same year, I will charge you a reasonable cost-based fee for each additional request.

6.      The Right to Correct or Update Your PHI. If you believe that there is a mistake in your PHI, or that a piece of important information is missing from your PHI, you have the right to request that I correct the existing information or add the missing information. I may say “no” to your request, but I will tell you why in writing within 60 days of receiving your request.

7.      The Right to Get a Paper or Electronic Copy of this Notice. You have the right get a paper copy of this Notice, and you have the right to get a copy of this notice by e-mail. And, even if you have agreed to receive this Notice via e-mail, you also have the right to request a paper copy of it.

EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS NOTICE

This notice went into effect on 1/1/2021

Acknowledgment of Receipt of Privacy Notice

Under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), you have certain rights regarding the use and disclosure of your protected health information. By checking the box below, you are acknowledging that you have received a copy of HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices.

BY CLICKING ON THE CHECKBOX BELOW I AM AGREEING THAT I HAVE READ, UNDERSTOOD AND AGREE TO THE ITEMS CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT.

CLIENT SIGNATURE ON PAPER DOCUMENT __________________________________________DATE


Information about Your Rights and Protections Against Surprise Medical Bills / Good Faith Estimate for Private Pay Clients

What is “balance billing” (sometimes called “surprise billing”)?

When you see a doctor or other health care provider, you may owe certain out-of-pocket costs, like a copayment, coinsurance, or deductible. You may have additional costs or have to pay the entire bill if you see a provider or visit a health care facility that isn’t in your health plan’s network.

“Out-of-network” means providers and facilities that haven’t signed a contract with your health plan to provide services. Out-of-network providers may be allowed to bill you for the difference between what your plan pays and the full amount charged for a service. This is called “balance billing.”This amount is likely more than in-network costs for the same service and might not count toward your plan’s deductible or annual out-of-pocket limit.

“Surprise billing” is an unexpected balance bill. This can happen when you can’t control who is involved in your care—like when you have an emergency or when you schedule a visit at an in-network facility but are unexpectedly treated by an out-of-network provider. Surprise medical bills could cost thousands of dollars depending on the procedure or service.

You’re protected from balance billing for:
*Emergency services
If you have an emergency medical condition and get emergency services from an out-of-network provider or facility, the most they can bill you is your plan’s in-network cost-sharing amount (such as copayments, coinsurance, and deductibles). You can’t be balance billed for these emergency services. This includes services you may get after you’re in stable condition, unless you give written consent and give up your protections not to be balanced billed for these post-stabilization services.

*Certain services at an in-network hospital or ambulatory surgical center
When you get services from an in-network hospital or ambulatory surgical center, certain providers there may be out-of-network. In these cases, the most those providers can bill you is your plan’s in-network cost-sharing amount. This applies to emergency medicine, anesthesia, pathology, radiology, laboratory, neonatology, assistant surgeon, hospitalist, or intensivist services. These providers can’t balance bill you and may not ask you to give up your protections not to be balance billed.

If you get other types of services at these in-network facilities, out-of-network providers can’t balance bill you, unless you give written consent and give up your protections.

You’re never required to give up your protections from balance billing. You also aren’t required to get out-of-network care. You can choose a provider or facility in your plan’s network.

When balance billing isn’t allowed, you also have these protections:

  • You’re only responsible for paying your share of the cost (like the copayments, coinsurance, and deductible that you would pay if the provider or facility was in-network).
  • Your health plan will pay any additional costs to out-of-network providers and facilities directly.

Generally, your health plan must:

  • Cover emergency services without requiring you to get approval for services in advance (also known as “prior authorization”).
  • Cover emergency services by out-of-network providers.
  • Base what you owe the provider or facility (cost-sharing) on what it would pay an in-network provider or facility and show that amount in your explanation ofbenefits.
  • Count any amount you pay for emergency services or out-of-network services toward your in-network deductible and out-of-pocket limit.

If you think you’ve been wrongly billed, contact HHS: 1-800-985-3059.

Visit www.cms.gov/nosurprises/consumers for more information about your rights under federal law.

Good Faith Estimate Disclaimer for Private Pay Clients only – Your therapist will provide a customized GFE based on your estimated needs.

Under Section 2799B-6 of the Public Health Service Act, healthcare providers and healthcare facilities are required to provide a good faith estimate of expected charges for items and services to individuals who are not enrolled in a plan or coverage or a Federal health care program, or not seeking to file a claim with their plan or coverage both orally and in writing, upon request or at the time of scheduling health care items and services.

These requirements don’t apply to people with coverage through programs like Medicare, Medicaid, Indian Health Services, Veterans Affairs Health Care, or TRICARE. These programs have other protections against high medical bills.

A good faith estimate must be provided within 3 business days upon request. Information regarding scheduled items and services must be furnished within 1 business day of scheduling an item or service to be provided in 3 business days; and within 3 business days of scheduling an item or service to be provided in at least 10 business days.

This Good Faith Estimate shows the costs of items and services that are
reasonably expected for your health care needs for an item or service. The estimate is based on information known at the time the estimate was created.

The Good Faith Estimate does not include any unknown or unexpected costs that may arise during treatment. You could be charged more if complications or special circumstances occur. If this happens, federal law allows you to dispute (appeal) the bill.

If you are billed for more than this Good Faith Estimate, you have
the right to dispute the bill.

You may contact the health care provider or facility listed to let them know the billed charges are higher than the Good Faith Estimate. You can ask them to update the bill to match the Good Faith Estimate, ask to negotiate the bill, or ask if there is financial assistance available.

You may also start a dispute resolution process with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). If you choose to use the dispute resolution process, you must start the dispute process within 120 calendar days (about 4 months) of the date on the original bill.

There is a $25 fee to use the dispute process. If the agency reviewing your dispute agrees with you, you will have to pay the price on this Good Faith Estimate. If the agency disagrees with you and agrees with the health care provider or facility, you will have to pay the higher amount.

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